Author: John L

Blog Post: Recent Goings On

Now that the sun is shining, spring has well and truly arrived. Recently, the RSPB has led a guided walk to highlight the wildlife finding a home at Hesketh Out Marsh and the surrounding area. Although the weather conditions were ideal for wildlife watching, it had a calming effect on the tide, which gently flooded the reserve. Particular highlights during the visit included a flock of 27 Mute Swans, and a Black Swan, several mixed flocks of Dunlin and Ringed Plover, a group of Eider approximately 25m off the sea wall, a resting Whimbrel and a peregrine looking for something to eat.                         Dunlin by Andy Hay (rspb-images.com) During numerous visits to the site over the past month it has been great to observe the increasing number of swallows and martins feeding over the pools. The avocets are also looking very settled across the site, as is the barn owl that has regularly been seen hunting over the long grass area beyond the car park. It has also been a great spring for other wildlife including the emergence of hibernating butterflies including Small Tortoiseshell and Peacocks as well as the occasional sighting of Orange Tip Butterflies. Whilst on a site visit today, a group of grey partridge and two brown hares were found in a neighbouring farmer’s field that had recently been worked, making them very visible. Brown Hare by Chris Gomersall (rspb-images.com) In other news at Hesketh Out Marsh, contractors are working on site once more so there is plenty of comings and goings during the day yet disturbance to the wildlife is kept to a minimum, especially during this important time of the year. Over the next week we are hoping to float our tern rafts to encourage common terns to use Hesketh Out Marsh as their summer residence, so keep a watch out for them and any other wildlife during your next visit.

Blog Post: Recent Goings On

Now that the sun is shining, spring has well and truly arrived. Recently, the RSPB has led a guided walk to highlight the wildlife finding a home at Hesketh Out Marsh and the surrounding area. Although the weather conditions were ideal for wildlife watching, it had a calming effect on the tide, which gently flooded the reserve. Particular highlights during the visit included a flock of 27 Mute Swans, and a Black Swan, several mixed flocks of Dunlin and Ringed Plover, a group of Eider approximately 25m off the sea wall, a resting Whimbrel and a peregrine looking for something to eat.                         Dunlin by Andy Hay (rspb-images.com) During numerous visits to the site over the past month it has been great to observe the increasing number of swallows and martins feeding over the pools. The avocets are also looking very settled across the site, as is the barn owl that has regularly been seen hunting over the long grass area beyond the car park. It has also been a great spring for other wildlife including the emergence of hibernating butterflies including Small Tortoiseshell and Peacocks as well as the occasional sighting of Orange Tip Butterflies. Whilst on a site visit today, a group of grey partridge and two brown hares were found in a neighbouring farmer’s field that had recently been worked, making them very visible. Brown Hare by Chris Gomersall (rspb-images.com) In other news at Hesketh Out Marsh, contractors are working on site once more so there is plenty of comings and goings during the day yet disturbance to the wildlife is kept to a minimum, especially during this important time of the year. Over the next week we are hoping to float our tern rafts to encourage common terns to use Hesketh Out Marsh as their summer residence, so keep a watch out for them and any other wildlife during your next visit.