Aviation funding for our mosslands

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Aviation funding for our mosslands cvarela Fri, 21/09/2018 - 15:18 Aviation funding for our mosslands A new stream of fundingThe Lancashire Wildlife Trust's Little Woolden Moss nature reserve has been chosen as one of the pilot areas for a new stream of funding from the aviation industry, which forms part of a wider sustainability strategy. The funding comes through the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA), designed to complement the basket of mitigation measures the air transport community is already pursuing to reduce CO2 emissions from international aviation. Funding is from Defra and Heathrow Airport, which has ambitions to become carbon neutral by 2020. Why have we...

Beach School

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Beach School cvarela Fri, 10/08/2018 - 16:00 Beach School A unique outdoor learning experience for local schoolsBeach School is a completely new and unforgettable way for children to immerse themselves in the wonders of the UK's seas. We aim to improve students' knowledge about their local coastal environment by connecting them with nature; opening their eyes to this amazing habitat and inspiring them to care for our coasts. 11% of under 14’s have never visited a British beach Not only that, but 64% of children play outside less than once a week. With just five minutes of 'green' exercise being proven to improve mental wellbeing, it is important that all children have th...
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Waterdale and Drinkwater Park

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Waterdale and Drinkwater Park cvarela Fri, 10/08/2018 - 10:50 Waterdale and Drinkwater Park The realm of the kingfisherThough now disused, the monolithic 13-arch railway viaduct that dominates this part of the Kingfisher Trail is a reminder of the area's former life as a thriving industrial hub. Now, Waterdale and Drinkwater Park is one of Bury’s best greenspaces. What can you see at Waterdale and Drinkwater Park? This is one of the best places on the Kingfisher Trail to see kingfishers, which hunt at Damshead Lodge: once part of a series of reservoirs which fed Waterdale Bleach and Dye works (famous for producing the colour Turkey Red). Kestrels, sparrowhawks, buzzards and even peregrine falcons can be seen along the impr...

Ringley Woods

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Ringley Woods cvarela Fri, 10/08/2018 - 10:20 Ringley Woods Mark Hamblin/2020VISION Lose yourself amongst ancient treesThe picturesque little village of Ringley sits alongside the River Irwell, nestled in the shadow of a steep wooded valley where birds of prey swoop silently between the trees. What can you see in Ringley Woods? Despite the encroachment of industry, much of Ringley Woods is classed as ancient and home to all the wildlife you would expect to find in an ancient woodland. Lose yourself amongst towering trees including English oak, ash, birch, alder, elm, beech, willow, sycamore, hawthorn, rowan, holly and hazel. Watch treecreepers and nuthatches scampering up the tree trunks...
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Firwood Fold

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Firwood Fold cvarela Fri, 10/08/2018 - 09:47 Firwood Fold Mark Hamblin/2020VISION The peaceful birthplace of Samuel CromptonFirwood Fold is a beautiful little hamlet by the side of Bradshaw Brook. Once surrounded by industry in the form of bleachworks, today, it is a picturesque and peaceful retreat with a very famous former resident: the inventor Samuel Crompton. What can you see at Firwood Fold? Immediately behind Samuel Crompton’s house is The Bunk, a large reservoir left over from the old bleachworks. It was originally fed by a channel connecting it to the large weir on Longsight Park (immediately by the Kingfisher Trail) and now, left to thrive, the area around The Bunk supports a...
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Accessible nature reserves

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Accessible nature reserves cvarela Thu, 09/08/2018 - 15:21 Accessibility on our nature reserves Amy Lewis Access for allWe believe that limited mobility shouldn't mean missing out on wildlife. Many of our reserves have accessible paths and boardwalks, disabled facilities and accessible bird hides, so you can fully immerse yourself in the great outdoors and discover the wonderful wildlife that lives on your doorstep. Ade Clarke @ClarkePictures The natural world should be for everyoneWe are working hard to make sure our beautiful reserves can be accessed by e...

Nature Recovery Network

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Nature Recovery Network cvarela Wed, 08/08/2018 - 15:55 Mapping a Nature Recovery Network Luke Massey/2020VISION We're influencing policies to help wildlife thriveWe’re working to influence the policies that set the rules that govern where and how development happens, and where public payments for nature go. We make the case upward to national Government to ensure local planning authorities have the right tools available to set strong policies to protect, restore and enhance wildlife; and that any public payments to farmers, foresters and other landowners and managers are used to best effect for nature’s recovery. We work at a local level to provide advice and work on the ground to h...

Injured wildlife advice

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Injured wildlife advice cvarela Mon, 06/08/2018 - 16:45 Injured wildlife advice Tom Hibbert What to do if you find a sick or injured animalAs your local Wildlife Trust we survey, monitor, conserve and campaign for wildlife across the region; lobbying Government and working on your doorstep to give wildlife a voice and protect important wild spaces. What we don't do, however, is take in injured wildlife. Unfortunately we aren't a wildlife rescue, and we don't have the facilities or the expertise to nurse birds, hedgehogs and other creatures back to health. So, what should you do if you find a sick or injured animal? It all depends on the kind of animal you have found and what appears to b...

Red Squirrel Project Volunteers – various roles

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Red Squirrel Project Volunteers - various roles cvarela Mon, 06/08/2018 - 15:25 Location: Various, Merseyside and west Lancashire FundraisingOutdoor ConservationSurveying / MonitoringContact detailsrcripps@lancswt.org.uk Our Red Squirrel Project needs your help! There are various roles available for those who can help us monitor, fundraise and more. Working across Merseyside and west Lancashire, the Red Squirrel Project is dedicated to helping our fragile red squirrel populations recover from the devastating pox virus outbreak of 2008, which saw 80% of the population wiped out. The good news is, you can help! We have various volunteer roles available within the Red Squirrel Project for people with a range of skillsets. You can see each role description below. To apply, first register to become a volunteer here, and then em...

Conservation Grazing Volunteer – various roles

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Conservation Grazing Volunteer - various roles cvarela Mon, 06/08/2018 - 14:59 Location: Various sites, Lunt Meadows, Lightshaw Meadows, Cutacre, Brockholes Livestock ManagementContact detailsSian Parry: sparry@lancswt.org.uk Our Conservation Grazing Officer needs volunteers to help check livestock on certain days on various sites. If you would like to count sheep (or cattle or ponies) in real life we might have just the opportunity for you! Our Conservation Grazing Officer needs volunteers to help check livestock on certain days on various sites, so if you live near to any of the sites below, can spare an hour or two, and would like to learn how to check the health and welfare of our conservation grazers, please read the full role description below. To apply please complete our volunteer registration form (if you haven...