Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

First Warbler and Catch Ups

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale


Burton In Kendal Chiffchaffs (Click over to enlarge)

Wednesday 15th March 2017 - Dalton Crags (0930hrs to 1100hrs)

Return of our first Chiffchaff (Craig) to Plain Quarry this morning, singing away in a subdued fashion. I guess its about right is the 15th and the date it is first recorded in most years.

Also the "Start" day for the passage of Meadow Pipits with 7 moving across the deforested (upper Crags) towards the North West direction (2,1,2,1,1) plus one already back on territory at the Trig Point on Hutton Roof.   Also had a Marsh Tit calling from the top of the lower Crags.

I can't help but wonder about "Alba Wagtails" which I don't see that many these days on Spring passage but that's probably because of where I am watching from , but looking back to the 80s I can remember from back down in East Lancs I would get scores of them all moving to the North West and they came early with good counts from around the 7th March.

Arnside (1600hrs to 1800hrs approx)

Recorded even more "Ceterach" (Rusty Back Fern) over in Arnside on the Promenade, also went along to the "Coastguard" area to check out the Maidenhair Fern and got this photo of last years produce!

Maidenhair Fern at Arnside (Click over to enlarge)
Last years offering still in reasonable shape!
Arnside



Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

Catch Up

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale

Thursday 2nd March 2017 - Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal

Just had a short stride up Vicarage Lane and could hear three separate Song Thrushes singing away and marking their territories, and they had lots of new repertoirre to offer I just could not book down their calls quick enough.... some really good stuff here!.

Going past Tram (don't know at this point whether I should call it upper or lower) but a good place where I stand sometimes during the Autumn to record the passing finches.  Although today I had my mind fixed upon "Squeaking the old Stoat! He's not a easy one, in fact I usually never have problems squeaking the Stoats and can bring them within a few yards before I frighten them away! but this chap is something different, I have tried several times before to get his attention but not yet! I do need to come up with a better "squeak" if I am to get anywhere with this lad!!

Some great reports from friends include: 

Reg has had his regular Winter Yellowhammers return to his garden on Morewood Drive. Phil has reported seeing four Tree Sparrowsin Dalton Hamlet and also he had a rare sighting of a “Ringtail” (either a female or juvenile = “Ringtail”) Hen Harrier crossing over the Trig Point and heading off down into Lancelot Clark Storth. More reports of Little Egrets either on the Mosses and also being reported from the gullies across from Station Road, Holme. Robert has had Merlinand Meadow Pipits showing on Hutton Roof. Skylarks were back on territory and singing as early as February 5th, but were not seen or heard the following day.

A "Wet" William Wordsworth Grave (Click over to enlarge) 

Yesterday (1st of March 2017) I guess I should have woke up and said “White Rabbits” as my first words uttered! But again I forgot, like I forget in most years…..  It’s a funny old custom which was handed down to me by my late mum who said I should always say it on the 1st March and then I would have good luck for the month or was it good luck for the year ahead.

Today it was great to do what we do on most Wednesday’s at this time of year, by having a brew and a butty and finish off with a piece of good old Sarah Nelson’s Gingerbread whilst at the same time sat trying to absorb some poetic inspiration and being sheltered by the fabulous Yew tree just at the side of William’s (and the rest of the Wordsworth clan’s graves.  It was gently raining today, but that was no problem for us because of this “thickened with age” grand Yew giving us a dry canopy whilst we sat on the nearby seat.  It's always a great privilege to sit under this very tree which was planted in this spot by none other than William himself. 

Surely what was so different today?  Ah! well no Jackdaws,  and as a rule we always have Jackdaws trying to scavenge any left overs or crumbs that maybe on offer.  Usually they are quite tame and will come within a couple of yards perching themselves on the upper ledge of nearby gravestones. Yet all was quiet here you normally hear them in the vicinity.  Still we had plenty of Robins and Dunnocks to keep us company!

Changing our rambling route by the day or even by the hour just before we hit the start, we chose to head through Deerbolt on the West side of Grasmere which eventually leads you to Rydal Caves.  On leaving Deerbolt I pictured from memory the vast area being covered by bluebells and imagining what a treat it will be for some "sore eyes"!  In fact I will dig out my photo from last time I saw this beautiful event.....which I have posted here.

This is how it may look around the 12th May

Not only this beautiful sight was going around in my mind but also the thoughts of the regular Cuckoo who usually you can hear calling from early May onwards.  But I guess for me the best has to come, whilst today all these scattered hawthorns seem bare! but soon (May) will have those songsters the Tree Pipits singing away from them whilst they perform their fluttering descending parachute from one higher tree towards one nearby lower tree. 

Also today we had small little groups of flowering daffodils, some of the miniature and some of the more regular and always somewhere close to a wooden seat.  Perhaps they were markers for someone to remember somebody.  Along this path and close to water flushes I can sometimes find Butterwort and Yellow Saxifrage, but not today, its far too early yet! (need to take another look around June time), also lower down by the river you will later be able to find Grass of Parnassus and Devils Bit Scabious and Bog Asphodel plus lots of other "GEMS" as well.

A welcome return to the Caves (Rydal Caves), not natural may I add but a left over of the old quarry.

Looking out from Rydal Caves (Click over to enlarge)






Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

Catch Up

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale

Thursday 2nd March 2017 - Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal

Just had a short stride up Vicarage Lane and could hear three separate Song Thrushes singing away and marking their territories, and they had lots of new repertoirre to offer I just could not book down their calls quick enough.... some really good stuff here!.

Going past Tram (don't know at this point whether I should call it upper or lower) but a good place where I stand sometimes during the Autumn to record the passing finches.  Although today I had my mind fixed upon "Squeaking the old Stoat! He's not a easy one, in fact I usually never have problems squeaking the Stoats and can bring them within a few yards before I frighten them away! but this chap is something different, I have tried several times before to get his attention but not yet! I do need to come up with a better "squeak" if I am to get anywhere with this lad!!

Some great reports from friends include: 

Reg has had his regular Winter Yellowhammers return to his garden on Morewood Drive. Phil has reported seeing four Tree Sparrowsin Dalton Hamlet and also he had a rare sighting of a “Ringtail” (either a female or juvenile = “Ringtail”) Hen Harrier crossing over the Trig Point and heading off down into Lancelot Clark Storth. More reports of Little Egrets either on the Mosses and also being reported from the gullies across from Station Road, Holme. Robert has had Merlinand Meadow Pipits showing on Hutton Roof. Skylarks were back on territory and singing as early as February 5th, but were not seen or heard the following day.

A "Wet" William Wordsworth Grave (Click over to enlarge) 

Yesterday (1st of March 2017) I guess I should have woke up and said “White Rabbits” as my first words uttered! But again I forgot, like I forget in most years…..  It’s a funny old custom which was handed down to me by my late mum who said I should always say it on the 1st March and then I would have good luck for the month or was it good luck for the year ahead.

Today it was great to do what we do on most Wednesday’s at this time of year, by having a brew and a butty and finish off with a piece of good old Sarah Nelson’s Gingerbread whilst at the same time sat trying to absorb some poetic inspiration and being sheltered by the fabulous Yew tree just at the side of William’s (and the rest of the Wordsworth clan’s graves.  It was gently raining today, but that was no problem for us because of this “thickened with age” grand Yew giving us a dry canopy whilst we sat on the nearby seat.  It's always a great privilege to sit under this very tree which was planted in this spot by none other than William himself. 

Surely what was so different today?  Ah! well no Jackdaws,  and as a rule we always have Jackdaws trying to scavenge any left overs or crumbs that maybe on offer.  Usually they are quite tame and will come within a couple of yards perching themselves on the upper ledge of nearby gravestones. Yet all was quiet here you normally hear them in the vicinity.  Still we had plenty of Robins and Dunnocks to keep us company!

Changing our rambling route by the day or even by the hour just before we hit the start, we chose to head through Deerbolt on the West side of Grasmere which eventually leads you to Rydal Caves.  On leaving Deerbolt I pictured from memory the vast area being covered by bluebells and imagining what a treat it will be for some "sore eyes"!  In fact I will dig out my photo from last time I saw this beautiful event.....which I have posted here.

This is how it may look around the 12th May

Not only this beautiful sight was going around in my mind but also the thoughts of the regular Cuckoo who usually you can hear calling from early May onwards.  But I guess for me the best has to come, whilst today all these scattered hawthorns seem bare! but soon (May) will have those songsters the Tree Pipits singing away from them whilst they perform their fluttering descending parachute from one higher tree towards one nearby lower tree. 

Also today we had small little groups of flowering daffodils, some of the miniature and some of the more regular and always somewhere close to a wooden seat.  Perhaps they were markers for someone to remember somebody.  Along this path and close to water flushes I can sometimes find Butterwort and Yellow Saxifrage, but not today, its far too early yet! (need to take another look around June time), also lower down by the river you will later be able to find Grass of Parnassus and Devils Bit Scabious and Bog Asphodel plus lots of other "GEMS" as well.

A welcome return to the Caves (Rydal Caves), not natural may I add but a left over of the old quarry.

Looking out from Rydal Caves (Click over to enlarge)






Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

The Language of the Song Thrush (February 2015)

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale



"Song Thrush" (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared with us courtesy of Craig Bell.  If you want to check out
more of Craig's bird photos then click here



I have been sat here enjoying my thoughts of the beautiful song thrush whilst in song at this very time of the year and have written the following poem (with the aid of the thrush) entitled "The Language of the Song Thrush (Feb/March time) which I hope you can enjoy:


Now is the time, the perfect time to listen to the Song Thrush,

Some may call him a "Throstle",
There are others (sad to say) who would call him (Throttle),
He sits so high he cannot go any further if he tried,
It's such a special time of the year for him to show to
ANOTHER, and the World at large, and what a show,
He will sing and sing and sing for one hour at once,
I love to write down his song in my little book,
In a language he would never understand!



"Wee-hoo-weehoo,

wee-hoo-weehoo,
wee hoo whit,
wee hoo whit,
wit woo,
wit woo,
her kleep kleep,
her kleep kleep,
chit chit chit chit,
See-it, see-it"


I think I could listen for hours at such a wonder,

Whilst all the World around are rushing everywhere,
This little fellow imparts his "wolf whistles",
and love to all who'll take time to listen to him.



"Song Thrush" (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared with us courtesy of Craig Bell.  If you want to check out 
more of Craig's bird photos then click here

Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

"Dipped In" (part 1)

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale


Dipper painting courtesy of RSPB


“Dipped In”  by Bryan Yorke – 9th February 2017.

Dippers everywhere! I was watching them on Tuesday beneath Nether Bridge on the Kent (I see them in more or less the same spot week in and week out),  and again yesterday I saw quite a few enjoying the fast flooded currents and flows of the Rothay, somewhere between Rydal and Ambleside whilst walking the back road which runs for most of its route alongside the River.  I guess in a strange sort of way it was the fabulous Dipper that got me started with my early birding career! So why the Dipper? Well I can honestly say when I was a child we did not have any Dippers close by to where I lived.
It had nothing whatsoever to do with seeing this special bird in the wild.  But it did have everything to do with Brooke Bond Tea and the splendid colourful “British Birds” photo cards which were placed within the outer wrapper of the tea packet. A series of 50 different bird cards were available of which you got one card per packet of tea purchased, but for some unknown reason the special one for me which took my fancy was always the Dipper with close second place going to our beautiful Wheatear! Strangely now looking back but that Dipper photo card had done something to me which probably I was not aware of at the time, but indirectly has stayed with me throughout life and given me so much pleasure throughout life not only looking at Dippers in reality but lots, lots more as well, and continues to do so today.

Also during the late 1950’s word must have got round our school that Yorkie was into birds! I remember that several kids from school or if not school from nearby where I lived would meet up to try and learn more about our feather friends. We would meet in my back yard or garden. A school friend Ken Tattersall turned up out of the blue at one of our meets with a shoe box under his arm, the box contained a poor injured House Sparrow which could not fly, he had travelled a long way from out Blackburn Road where he lived just below the Parish Church all the way up to our house at Hud Hey (which was over one mile or even further more).  He must have thought we could fix the injured bird.  But none of us could have prepared for what happened next when he opened the box and took out the bird which without warning ran across the back garden which was built on a grand elevated position and somehow incredibly it found this little hole of 6” square and ran through it and disappeared.  There was a drop of some 25ft into the farmers field which was directly below.  We all went quickly round and into the field to hopefully relocate the bird, but we searched everywhere without any luck at all.  So two things could have happened, 1 either the bird was being very evasive and went undetected or was it that 2) On the bird flying off such a elevated position allowed it to continue flying and flew off to safety.  No one will ever know, but the second theory is probably the best….”

Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

More recent notes!

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale


I AM SORRY I HAVE NOT HAD MUCH TO SAY RECENTLY. Its because I am currently convalescing on doctors orders and got to take things easy for a bit. Only getting around the local lanes and fields (strictly on level ground for a few weeks) where I am seeing one large party of mixed Yellowhammers, Tree Sparrows, Chaffinch and Goldfinch.

Robert Ashworth from Kendal has been keeping in touch regular to give me the heads up on Hutton Roof, and so far we have not had a visit from the Grey Grey Shrike, also Dr. Stuart has been keeping me informed about the Woodcock, Jack Snipe and Common Snipe situation from Dalton Hall Estate.

We have not had any further Waxwings to my knowledge since the last report offered up by Robert.

Will keep writing and annoying you at my first opportunity, all the best Bryan.




***************************************************

Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

Chaffinch numbers slightly down but still very reasonable

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale



The price you pay to be a "vismigger" - Click over to enlarge

It looks very much like the vismig (visible bird migration) season could well be over for another year, or that's how it looks to me at the moment!

Any birds is great! although perhaps numbers have been down if we take into consideration past years records and notes for comparisons. And following on it's probably a good job we have got these records to show these changes.

The Thrush Push - Little happened this year with just a flurry of the Fieldfare peaking here between the 20th and 22nd October with counts of 3165 and 3007 respectively over a approx four hour period. The Redwing as is usual (but not always the case) a little earlier with the main activity this year on the 9th October when I had 2586 over a four hour period.  I also had yet another reasonable count of 1602 two days later on the 11th October.

Looking back to the 1980's when I first started checking out the vismig and bird numbers, I do remember that in most years the start of the main migration of Fieldfare seem to edge more to the early November days as "peak" days where nowadays its been creeping up more towards the middle of October. The Redwing which never really historically got going before about the middle of October can nowadays but not always be a week or ten days earlier starting to come through. Well I guess whats a few days early, or a week or two! you might ask....

As each recent year goes by it's as though "a cataract is forming and just keeps on growing year by year". Gone seem the days when I got many more thousands of grouped thrushes making them special peak day offerings, when you could expect any numbers between five or ten or even teens of thousands to appear along those long established well chosen ancient corridors which for us usually (but not always) come up from the direction of the Aire Gap and progressed West/North West up towards the Lyth Valley where they established themselves for a few days feeding up before they secretly move off!

The Chaffinch  - Our area is without any doubt superb for the onward passage of Chaffinch and to a far lesser Goldfinch to which seem to come from several different lines from the West/North and North East. One line comes in as though following the motorway and then crosses over Burton whilst keeping heading to a South East at points between Dalton Hall and Priest Hutton, another main route and the one I tend to watch more regularly appears to come from the direction of the Lyth Valley and Whitbarrow, then continues above and over Vicarage Lane and joins up also with birds coming across from Curwen Wood, Lancelot Clark Storth onward over the Dalton Hall Estate to probably Capernwray and maybe Arkholme and onward. Another line follows the East side of Farleton and Hutton Roof and will then make a lift near to the point of reaching Kelker. The birds then seem to cross over points of Uberash and almost to the point where the Trig Point lies before going onward in a Capernwray direction. I have spent lots of time observing this line from a point near the summit close to Whin Yeates. .

The following records are purely from Chaffinch counts made of the birds that directly fly over the Vicarage Lane Area. Going back three years to 2014 I had some superb counts from near Vicarage Lane, Burton in Kendal when on peak days I had eg: October 9th 1310 birds (over 6 hours), October 10th 1351 birds (over 6hrs), October 18th 1022 birds (over 4 hours) and a later secondary peak on October 25th 1079 birds over 4 hours). Totals from that watchpoint for the full time observing (Sept 10th to Nov 3rd 2014) was as follows: 15,955 (Fifteen thousand nine hundred and fifty five birds) over 130 hours watching.

Now then 2015 varies a lot because quite a lot of the time I was watching odd days from a different site, however it was still noticed that from the times I was at the Vicarage Lane site (the main peak period), the counts were very low in comparative to what I had in 2014 eg: The only peak days I had were October 11th 121 birds (over 3 hours, October 15th 133 birds (over 3 1/2 hours) October 16th 118 birds (over 3 hours), October 17th 104 birds (over 7 hours) and a later secondary peak on 31st October with 122 birds (over 4 hours). Totals from that same watchpoint for the full time observing (Intermediate dates between Sept 10th to Nov 3rd 2015) was as follows: 1,397 (One thousand three hundred and ninety seven birds) over a 68 hours watching. 
Although dividing my time counting from another site as well.  I did spend all the peak period Oct 4th to 31st) counting from this same (Vicarage Lane) site although with lesser hours, yet the numbers had dropped staggeringly low in comparison to 2014.

During 2016 I have maintained the same watch site and the numbers have been as follows for the peaks.  September 21st 314 birds (over 3 1/2 hours), September 26th 841 (over 4 1/2hours), September 30th 355 (over 4 hours) and more peaks Oct 1st 621 birds (over 2 3/4 hours), Oct 2nd 528 birds over 3 3/4hours, and Oct 3rd 713 birds (over 4hrs) a much later peak presented itself on Oct 15th 698 birds (over 2hrs) and finally Oct 16th 683 birds (over 2 1/2hours) - Totals from the same watchpoint for the full time observing (Sept 10th to Nov 3rd 2016) was as follows: 12,577 (Twelve thousand five hundred and 77 birds) over a 138 hour watching period.

I was at first alarmed by the decrease in Chaffinch between 2014 and 2015, but now having done the 2016 counts I am more happy that numbers are not so bad after all.

Things are just about (slowly) getting back to normal and I have paid several visits up to the Trig Point in particular searching for the Great Grey Shrike, but to no avail at the moment (10th November 2016), although no Shrike, Its been great to have a report from Robert Ashworth who had a party of four Waxwings crossing over Dalton and Lancelot last Saturday.

There were hundreds of thrushes present (mainly in Dalton Crags) but these seem to have moved on at the moment.

Also had the regular two Stonechats (paired) who seem to like overwintering in Dalton Crags, odd Snipe being flushed on the Common.


I had forgot all about Max Ming, must have done this about ten years ago!
Click over to enlarge


THERE WAS PLENTY GOING ON AT ARNSIDE KNOTT BACK IN 2012 but I have not heard of any around there yet!

Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

2016 Autumn Visible Bird Migration has started and here are my records to press!

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale
Thursday 8th September 2016 - Off Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal  1330hrs to 1415hrs

Swallow: 39 (all SE) (9,17,12,1)
Meadow Pipit: 4 (SE)

Friday 9th September 2016 - Off Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal 1020hrs to 1120hrs
All SE unless stated otherwise

Swallow: 12 (2,4,6)
House Martin: 2 (paired)
Goldfinch: 1
Chaffinch: 32 (singles, pairs odd 5,4) - Some birds to SW
Meadow Pipit: 1
Woodpigeon: 1
HERON at least 200ft high going East to West.


Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

What floral beauties line the margins of Burton’s crop fields – Whilst SWALLOWS wave ta-ta!

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale


Unusual 15 petalled "Creeping Buttercup"  (Click over to enlarge)

Over the past few weeks I have been passing crop fields just off Vicarage Lane in Burton In Kendal. Some fields will have Maize whilst others have Fodder Beet and it always surprises me just what flora gems are lurking in the margins.

I had to take a photo of the strange Creeping Buttercup (photo shown above).  I have never seen one like this before, and it has 15 petals formed in 3 layers of 5.

Another one on show every year is the Black Nightshade (Solanum nigrum). I can only think its called that because of the black berry which should start to appear very soon now.  Because other than that there is no black present.  The flower is white and yellow with green leaves and dark green stems. I am told that not only its rare cousin the Belladonna or Deadly Nightshade is extremely poisonous but also the Black Nightshade's unripened fruit or its leaves contain Solanine and even more dangerous Antropine.  So let's leave that one alone and just enjoy the photograph "nuff said" !!!

Black Nightshade (Solanum nigrum) - Click over to enlarge
Another plant that seems to frequent the crop margins is the Galinsoga quadriradiata which looks very similar to the Gallant Soldier (G. Parviflora).


Galinsoga quadriradiata (Click over to enlarge)

(Click over photo to enlarge)

Top Left: Knotgrass (Polygonum) Top Right: Plaintain (Plantago)
Bottom Left: Groundsel (Senecio) Bottom Right: Redshank (Persicaria)

(Click over photo to enlarge)

Top Left: A mixture Top Right: Fat Hen (Chenopodium)
Bottom Left: Groundsel (Senecio), Sow Thistle (Sonchus asper)


THERE ARE EVEN MORE FLORAL PHOTOS WHICH I WILL ADD WHEN I GET CHANCE TO SORT THEM........ Soon heading off up thi'hill to a "birding experience" vismigging starts anyday soon with lots and lots of SWALLOWS!!  SO PLEASE COME BACK AND CHECK OUT WHAT BIRDIES HAVE BEEN WAVING TA-TA!!

Source I Love Arnside & Silverdale

A Hedgehog fungi and Montanum Day (23rd August 2016)

Posted on - In I Love Arnside & Silverdale


Well I have lots of stuff to blog about as soon as I can and will share with you soon.  I have recorded but not yet put into blog a piece on “Flowers I have found on the edges of Maize or Fodder Beet fields in Dalton near Burton in Kendal” you may be surprised just to see what variety we get take for instance: Solanum nigrum or maybe better known as the Black Nightshade and what about Galinsoga quadriradiata which isn’t but just looks very similar to it’s relation the Gallant Soldier.  But that’s all for another day because today I want to talk about what went on Tuesday last when I decided to make it a Hedgehog and Montanum day.


Hypericum Montanum No.3 - Click to enlarge
It started whilst going through Dalton Crags and looking out for just anything available and worthy of note.  It was even worth (to me) to make gps notes to where all the Hypericum Perforatum was and subsequently recorded, because this information could be very beneficial to just where the species was on the Hutton Roof complex and its association (perhaps) to another rare hypericum species which I have been fortunate to recently find.  I didn’t mean going out of my way, but to record all I could see from the forestry track on my way up from Nineteen Trees and onward through the Crag. 

Climbing up through the lower crags and stopping off talking with folk and making notes and stopping to take the odd photo I eventually arrived at the little beauties which were my first intended destination of the beautiful day to check out the near hypericum montanums (population no.3) or known as the Pale St. John's Wort. So out with the camera to capture the plant (see left). I also found another nearby (20ft at least) and up to seven seedlings which hopefully will mature and prosper and be on view in future years.  Its always worth checking the leaves of our specimens on HR because so far every one I have checked have shown perforatum within the leaf and according to all the text books at my avail, this should not be happening.  So you can see why I am noting even common species such as "Perforated" because I wonder if some hybrid meddling has taken place here somewhere along the line.  Another "perforatum" species I regular encounter up here on Hutton Roof is Hypericum Pulchrum (or Slender St. John's Wort) and maybe that species could well have also played its part in this strange phenomena.  Time will tell.

No sooner had I left the little beauties than I was to bump into this fabulous chap which I can only
Dung Beetle - Click over to enlarge
imagine maybe he was some sort of dung beetle, he was large and had large folded brown transparentish wings which now and again he would display in a sort of threatening posture as though perhaps I was too close and he was showing me he was ready to take to the wing should I go one step further. I enjoyed watching him for another ten minutes or so whilst he took on his mountainous terrain and at times wobbling on the "tipping point" similar to how you see the land-rover on a assault course.  The amount of times I find these larger beetles on their back with legs waving about and helpless.
This chap today seem to be doing fine.

Climbing even further through Dalton and again noting all "perforatum" on the way up and just before the "Line of Trees" I glanced across to the butterfly bush (buddlea). All the times I go up here and have never noticed it before.  It looked well out of place up here amongst all the natural stuff but I guess it would be playing its part in bringing in lots of the more abundant butterflies like the Torts, Red Admirals and Peacocks which I were seeing plenty of today

Its quickly becoming that time of year again "Visible Bird Migration".  Good job I had my binoculars with me and checking out the far wall was not to be disappointing with a fabulous Wheatear with the most upright posture I have ever seen, a proper standing to attention bird! and only perhaps a few metres to its left a lovely Stonechat which later made off to the ground and quickly back up onto some shrub high point where it could have its temporary "watchpoint". I was wondering if this would be the pair already come back to their regular wintering territory or would it be just a solitary bird passing through!  I guess the wheatears are on the move and will have come in overnight and dropped in to feed up before setting off again later that night onward towards their final destination of South Africa. I was to also see another Wheatear as I got further around and coming down through Lancelot Clark Storth.

"Ramosum " A. Scollopendrium Click to enlarge
Onward and upward through the boundary and on to the Common stopping briefly at the Trig Point to take in the magnificient views. Soon I was looking for "Ramosum" and sure enough he gave me a quick wave with his many tentacle fingers. He doesn't change much from year to year its a very strong looking plant and always worthy of yet another photograph.

Descending the Crags and then ascending the next set of Crags in search of the small hedgehog fungi better known as the Spiny Puffball fungi.  Back in 2014 I had seven of them but last year this was down to one and this year I just drew a blank with none at all showing. I checked out all the surrounding areas without success.

Its not long before I am fighting my way through lots of undergrowth barely penetrable but hiding yet another beautiful pavement, and this is were Montanum No.2 lives, just a singular plant which seems to survive in the most precarious of places on the side of a well fractured gryke.  I have now watched this plant over three years and as yet there have been no additions, neither have I noticed any set seedlings in the immediate areas.  Its lies about one mile away from No.1 and some one and a half miles away from No.3 yet here again we have another rare specimen with the unique "perforatum" leaves!

During my adventures today I was fortunate to see quite a few butterflies which were mainly Small Tortoiseshells, Red Admirals and at one point whilst entering Lancelot Clark Storth (A Cumbria Wildlife Reserve) I had the pleasure to see a Wall Brown Butterfly on Ragwort.


Soon I arrived at the home of Hypericum Montanum No.1, and this was the very first specimen of this particular species which I located back in 2013 and it has done well every year since.  Or should I say that is up to this year.  For some reason the main group of eight plants has just not appeared this year although the surrounding plants are all doing fine.

Finished off the day checking out Angular Solomon's Seal, lots of gone over Epipactis "orchids" and also the rare Southern Polypody Ferns.