Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Work experience by Abigail Naylor, Clitheroe Royal Grammar School Sixth Form

Posted on - In Ribble Rivers Trust

Work experience with the Trust Monday When I arrived, I was introduced to the team members and I was shown around the building. After a health and safety brief by Emily, I was given some leaflets and information about the trust and what they do within the catchment. I then visited Bashall Brook with Adam and we checked the quality of a newly built fenced area to ensure it would be suitable and hold up in Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Work experience, by Marco Dobson

Posted on - In Ribble Rivers Trust

From the basis of wanting to do an enjoyable and interesting work experience, I contacted the Ribble Rivers Trust (RRT). Through one week of working among the people here at the RRT, I have learnt so much like fish ID, invertebrate ID, knowledge of land, tree ID, erosion defence techniques and much much more. The people here have helped me understand the importance of the work that the RRT team do: without this work, the Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Angling- recreation on our rivers

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When thinking of sport, not everyone will think of angling however, it is one of the most popular sports in the UK. The fishing industry is worth over £3 billion per year, with over 100,000 weekly participants and over 4,000,000 people having been fishing in the past 2 years. Coarse fishing is the most popular type of fishing, with participants fishing rivers, canals, lakes, or ponds, and returning caught fish to the water. There are Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Reconnecting the Darwen Sub-Catchment

Posted on - In Ribble Rivers Trust

Hoghton Bottoms Weir is the largest of many on the River Darwen that create a barrier to fish movement. Structures like this are a problem for fish, like brown trout and salmon, that migrate downstream to find suitable food sources before returning to their spawning grounds in the smaller stretches upstream to mate. Fish use a large amount of energy attempting to get over barriers like this and this affects their success at breeding. Out Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

The River Darwen

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The River Darwen begins on the South Pennine Moors. It then flows through a valley of Carboniferous rocks, including limestone, Millstone Grit, shales and coal, to meet the River Ribble in Preston. The River Darwen has one of the most impressive gorges in Lancashire, known as Hoghton Bottoms. The bedrock is largely covered by glacial and post-glacial deposits of sands, gravels, clays and alluvium. Where the bedrock is exposed at the surface, there is a Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Work experience; helping students relate their learning to real world scenarios

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Work experience By Dan McGibbon As a third year Geography student at university, gaining work experience has become a must for progressing from a student to someone who is in full time work. The Ribble Rivers Trust was kind enough to offer me some work experience and it’s somewhere I highly recommend if considering for a placement choice. Getting involved with the Ribble Rivers Trust offered a great opportunity to gain experience in catchment management Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

This Christmas keep our sewers clear!

Posted on - In Ribble Rivers Trust

This festive season we’re asking people across the UK to help keep our rivers and beaches clean by making sure all their leftover cooking fats and oils are put in the bin rather than poured down the sink. If leftover fat from cooking the Christmas dinner goes down the sink, even with hot water and washing up liquid, it soon sets hard in the cold pipes. When it mixes with other unflushable items, such as wet Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Call of Nature campaign appeals for septic tank maintenance checks on World Toilet Day

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World Toilet Day is a UN initiative taking place on Sunday 19th November with the aim to improve global sanitation. Although the majority of the North West waste water is safely treated through the United Utilities network risks to local rivers and seas are still prevalent through privately maintained waste water treatment works. The Call of Nature campaign has been designed to inform occupants of septic tanks, cesspits & package sewage treatment plants about the risks Continue Reading...

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Source Ribble Rivers Trust

Only leave paw prints and foot prints in the sand…

Posted on - In Ribble Rivers Trust

Hundreds of bags of dog poo have been found on the UK’s beaches according to the Marine Conservations Society’s 2016 research; with 792 bags recorded at 364 beaches by volunteers over the Great British Beach Clean weekend in September last year. However these numbers don’t show the full scale of the problem; beach clean volunteers do not record unbagged waste therefore the total amount of dog poo left by some owners on our beautiful beaches Continue Reading...

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