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Three Finches

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Our targeting of finches at Oakenclough near Garstang paid off again with three very interesting recoveries via the BTO - a Siskin, a Goldfinch and a Lesser Redpoll. 

A Goldfinch we ringed with letter/number Z470813 on 18th February 2016 was later recaptured by members of Grampian Ringing Group at Newburgh, Aberdeenshire on 1st March 2017, just over one year later and 381kms north of Oakenclough. 

We tend to think of Goldfinches as a somewhat sedentary garden bird but the species is a partial migrant throughout its extensive range in Europe and Asia, with its northern limit approximately along the line of the 60° latitude. Aberdeen is situated at the latitude of 57 degrees. 

This first year female had probably moved south to winter in England for 2016/207 but was returning to Scotland as early as 1st March 2017.

 Goldfinch

Goldfinch - Oakenclough to Aberdeen

The second recovery concerns Siskin with ring number Z470786. Andy and I caught this adult male on 11th February 2016 at Oakenclough. It had a good weight of 14.2 grams suggesting that it was on migration to the conifer forests of Scotland or perhaps Ireland, a typical movement we have seen with other records in the spring.  Z470786 was later recaptured 13th April 2017 at the RSPB Bird Reserve of Lake Vyrnwy, Powys, Wales. 

Siskins with their unpredictable main food supply are known to make irregular movements in search of food, and an individual does not necessarily winter in the same location each year. RSPB reserves generally have good supplies of bird food on offer to draw in both birds and birders. 

Siskin

 
Siskin - Oakenclough to Lake Vyrnwy

The third recovery involves a second winter/spring Lesser Redpoll of S295643 that Andy and I caught at Oakenclough as the first bird of the day at 0600 on 8th April 2017. The original ringing details tell us that S295643 was first ringed by Graeme, an ex-member of Fylde Ringing Group who now rings with Cuckmere Ringing Group. The Goldfinch  was ringed on 28th October 2016 at Litlington, East Sussex. 

This is a classic case of a young Lesser Redpoll migrating south to spend the winter in probably France or Belgium and then returning north in the following spring. 

Lesser Redpoll

 
Lesser Redpoll - Litlington to Oakenclough

Meanwhile during my recent holiday in Menorca, another and different outbreak of avian flu occurred in our area at Thornton-Cleveleys in a backyard flock of chickens and ducks. A 3 km Protection Zone and a 10 km Surveillance Zone have been put in place around the infected premises to limit the risk of the disease spreading and there is a ban on ringing in those zones. 
 
 Avian flu exclusion zone

These outbreaks are becoming all too frequent but hopefully things will settle down soon. Let's  hope so.




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Living Dangerously

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After yesterday I just knew that Oystercatcher nest was close to the road. But why would the silly birds make their nest just 12 inches from the verge where vehicles whizz by and where just yards away large wagons and other vehicles park while the occupants stretch their legs. 

Feet away on the other side of the hedgerow is Conder Pool with tons of places they might set up home. The “oyks” picked a spot where a tiny area of gravel lies next to a roadside marker post. Good luck with that - they will need it. 

Oystercatcher

 Oystercatcher nest

Oystercatcher nest

Maybe the other pairs of Oystercatchers, at least four others around the pool, chased them away, or possibly the two pairs of Avocets? I noted that the female Common Tern is now sat on her nest on the floating pontoon, the bird just visible behind the opaque screen while the male stood guard just a metre away. 

Also today in my flying visit – 120 Black-tailed Godwit, 8 Tufted Duck, 6 Little Egret, 2 Wigeon, 2 Greylags, and a handful of both Sand Martins and Swallows. Two Ravens croaked overhead as they flew around in a circle and then back up the river towards Lancaster. 

Greylags

Black-tailed Godwit

I drove down towards Bank End in time to see a rainbow and just before it dissolved into the morning sunshine. 

Bank End, Cockerham

Bank End, Cockerham

The quarry held about 120+ Sand Martins, two pairs of Oystercatcher and a pair of Redshanks. At the end of the lane I counted 15/20 Lapwing and 6 Oystercatcher on the bare earth field where I think the farmer has designs that don’t include nesting waders. In the coppice there was both Blackcap and Willow Warbler in song plus a male Reed Bunting singing from a post on the marsh. I watched the male fly into a patch of reedy marsh and where it was joined by a female. 

Redshank

A Pied Wagtail waited for my car to move as she sat on a barbed wire fence with a bill full of sheep’s’ wool with which to line her nest. There’s enough sheep’s wool around here to line a million nests. Eight or ten Brown Hares were having a frenzied chase around until one stopped to take a morning wash. 

Brown Hare

Pied Wagtail

I had things to do like still catching up from Menorca, but time to take a look at Gulf Lane. 

Farmer Richard has replanted his set-aside with a crop of wild bird seed and other goodies so that the field looks spot-on for a productive autumn of ringing as long as there’s no more avian flu. There was Sedge Warbler singing from the ditch, Oystercatcher on eggs, a pair of Skylarks, 5 Stock Dove and a distant Buzzard. 

Things are looking good!

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Conder And How Not to Bird

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Things have sure moved on since last I was at Conder Green. There are now two pairs of Avocets breeding plus a pair of Common Terns showing all the signs. I was there this morning and somewhat surprised to see two Avocets flying from the pool to feed in the creek and to then see two pairs on the far island – six Avocets in total. 

The ones on the island are very distant but the two in the creeks gave a half decent chance for a picture. Early on I’d counted 170 Black-tailed Godwits, split 100/70 in favour of the creek. 

Avocet

Avocet and Black-tailed Godwit

Black-tailed Godwit

Also on the pool, a pair of Common Terns spent time and energy around the metal pontoon and fishing out towards the River Lune. I watched the male bring in small fish with which to entice the female to stay around; it looked like she was impressed. 

Common Terns

A couple of pairs of Redshank were in display mode plus several pairs of Oystercatcher, Mute Swan and 6 Tufted Duck as 3 pairs. In the creeks I saw a Grey Heron, a single Little Egret and 12 Shelduck. 

There’s a pair of Oystercatchers breeding very close to the road, so close that they think nothing of playing “Oystercatcher Chicken” with oncoming traffic as they casually walk to the verge when a vehicle approaches. The Oystercatcher is a very common bird and also a very handsome one I think you will agree. 

Oystercatcher

Oystercatcher


 Oystercatcher

Good thing I was there early as a “birder” arrived, dressed in suit, shirt and tie for the office party and pretty clueless as to how to bird. He proceeded to walk down into the creeks with apparently no thought to the fact that wild birds have eyes, ears and the ability to fly away from predators like man. I guess when he got to the office he explained how he went bird watching but didn’t see much, just birds flying away? 

How Not To Bird

I pretty much cleaned up on singing warblers with 2 Blackcap, 2 Sedge Warbler, 2 Whitethroat, 2 Willow Warbler, 1 Chiffchaff, and 1 Reed Warbler. In the same patch as the Reed Warbler was a singing Reed Bunting. Over and around pool the main hedgerow - 2 Stock Dove, 4 Swift and a handful of Swallows. 

I took a drive around Jeremy Lane and up to Cockersands to find a day-flying Barn Owl and a good number of Sedge Warblers, Whitethroats and Skylarks – a minimum ten of each. 

While Sedge Warblers mostly sing hidden in the depths of a roadside ditch they do sometimes like to use a high point like telegraph poles from which to launch into their song flight.

Sedge Warbler

I saw good numbers of Brown Hare, Lapwings young and old and stopped to picture at Swallow waiting for to farmer open up the barn. 

Lapwing chick

Lapwing

Swallow

Please look in tomorrow when there’s news of a Siskin, a Lesser Redpoll and a Goldfinch.




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A Menorca Mishap

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We had a great time in Menorca. Two weeks of unadulterated sunshine and not a drop of rain. We visited most of our favourite island places and saw lots of birds. Birding highlights proved to be thousands of Common Swift delayed from heading north by days of northerly winds. Mixed in with the common we saw a few Alpine Swifts, Swallows and Sand Martins. We had a morning of migrating Red-footed Falcons together with superb views of a female Montague’s Harrier. 

There was a disaster when on day two I damaged my Canon 400mm lens to the extent that for the rest of the holiday I had to use a bog standard 35-135mm zoom – not good for taking bird pictures. Apologies then for the lack of bird pictures but please do enjoy the extra number of photographs of sunny Menorca. Don't forget to "click the pics" to enjoy the sunshine.

We saw Scop’s Owls every evening in the hotel grounds where they appeared as if by clockwork about 2130 to feed on moths and beetles. About 400 yards away another pair of Scop’s spent their daylight hours roosting in a pine tree after annoying the hotel guests with their monotone hooting throughout the night. This owl has reputation for being hard to see as it sits motionless against the trunk of a tree. On some days both owls were sat within inches of each other but on other days just a single one would sit unperturbed as people below struggled to give definition to the dark shapes above. 

Hotel Sant Tomas

Sant Tomas, Menorca

Scop's Owl

Scop's Owl

On day one, May 1st, a few late Wheatears could be seen along the hotel frontage or in the grounds. The local Turtle Doves can get fairly tame, quite unlike their country cousins who live their lives away from tourists. As ever, Spotted Flycatchers can be found near tourist spots where a 135mm lens shows how the species is tiny. 

Wheatear

Turtle Dove
 
Spotted Flycatcher

In the centre of the picture below is El Toro, at 342 metres, the highest point of the island. There are few birds up there except for Greenfinch, Goldfinch and the ubiquitous Sardinian Warbler and House Sparrow. The many viewpoints do give good views of the island common raptors, Red Kite, Booted Eagle, Egyptian Vulture and Kestrel. Naturally there’s a shop selling tourist goods but like most places in Menorca the parking is free and there is never a feeling that visitors to the island are simply cash cows.
 
 At Torre del Daume

View from El Toro

El Toro

Ciutadella

Ciutadella

Es Migjorn

Es Migjorn

Es Migjorn

Cookery demo - Es Migjorn

Menorcan centipede

It was on day two that I broke my lens. We had stopped at the Cattle Egret colony on the outskirts of Ciutadella and taken a few pictures before contusing on to Punta Nati and the specialities of Blue Rock thrush, Short-toed Lark, Thekla Lark and Corn Bunting. 

Cattle Egret

Cattle Egret

Cattle Egrets

By early May the Menorca breeding season is well under way with most species either feeding young in or out of the nest. Upon crossing one rocky field I heard the warning “chip, chip” calls of adult Corn Buntings and within a few minutes found a young Corn Bunting hiding in the grass. Like many ground nesting birds, young Corn Buntings leave the nest before they can fly. It’s an evolutionary adaptation that lessens the chances of a nest full of youngsters falling victim to a predator whereby at least one or two young will survive to adulthood. 

Corn Bunting

Corn Bunting

I tripped over a particularly well hidden rock and dropped my lens onto the stony ground. Today I’ll parcel it up and see if a lens doctor can make it better. If not, those floorboards will need to come up. 

The road between Es Mercadal and Cap de Cavalleria proved the best for birding with regular Bee-eaters, Red Kite, Booted Eagle, Egyptian Vulture, Marsh Harrier, Stonechat, Sardinian Warbler, Cetti’s Warbler, Nightingale, Tawny Pipit and a mix of herons. We managed to see the regular species of Purple Heron, Grey Heron, Squacco Heron and Little Egret. It was along the same road that one morning we found a single but superb female Montague’s Harrier quartering the fields. A morning following overnight cloud and a cool start saw a movement of 15/20 Red-footed Falcons quite high in the sky and drifting steadily north. We found a single female on a roadside post which gave us a short but spectacular hunting display above a thistle-filled field before she too hurried on. When we checked the road the very next morning all had gone, along with hundreds of Swifts that had filled the sky. 

To Cavalleria

Damselfly

Near Cap de Cavelleria

Es Prat, Tirant

Es Mercadal

Es Grau produced water birds like Coot, Gadwall, Little Grebe, Great Crested Grebe, Purple Heron, Grey Heron and Little Egret. Yellow-legged Gulls nest here but I think the much less common Audouin’s Gull nest only on offshore islands. 

Audouin's Gull at Es Grau

Es Grau

Gadwall

Es Grau

Es Grau

 Es Grau

 Es Grau

Hopefully I will be up and running soon with local news and my lens back in action for better photos; so log in soon to Another Bird Blog. 




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Mad For Menorca

Posted on - In Another Bird Blog
We counted. This is our fourteenth time in Menorca. And yes, it is that special. There’s very little blogging while Sue and I are away so I posted a few pictures from Menorca, both birds and photos of special places.

Don’t forget – “click the pics” for a trip to sunny Menorca. 

Mahon, Menorca

Es Migjorn, Menorca

Coffee Time, Menorca

Fornells village, Menorca

Cattle Egret

Turtle Dove

Egyptian Vulture

Wood Sandpiper and Common Sandpiper

Menorcan Panda

Hoopoe

Es Grau, Menorca

Black-winged Stilt

Cattle Egret

Greater Short-toed Lark

Punta Nati- Menorca

Bee-eater

Audouin's Gull

Red-footed Falcon

Ciutadella - Menorca

Serrano Jamon

 Hoopoe

 Red Kite

Bee-eater

Menorcan Friends

More Coffee Menorca Style

 Back soon with more news, views and photographs home and away on Another Bird Blog.

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Birding Around The Block

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I had just a couple of hours spare to whizz around the block this morning. It proved quite productive thanks to the usual spots of Conder Green and Cockersands with both Sedge Warblers and Whitethroats much in evidence. I also saw my first Whinchat of the spring. 

There was a lot to see and hear at Conder Green, both in the creeks and on the pool. April and May is the peak time for the brick-red "Icelandic" Black-tailed Godwits that pass through this region,  when many hundreds of them may appear at favoured locations. For example up to 1,000 this week at the RSPB reserve of Leighton Moss some 20 miles north of here.

I made do with just three godwits today. They fed in the creek below the road and sharing the spoils with 3 Little Egret, 3 Greenshank, 2 Common Sandpiper, 4 Teal and 12 Redshank. 

Black-tailed Godwit
 
One Kestrel hunted the marsh and the roadside while several Swallows flew around and then over. At the nearby bridge and creek-side houses there’s no sign of House Martins yet but I did see one in the week at a neighbour’s house that hosts several nests each year. The martins are now definitely “late” as are our Swifts, held up somewhere to the south of here. I’m expecting to see thousands of Swifts next week, but not around here. Somewhere a little warmer and sunnier. 

Meanwhile on the pool the female Avocet sat tight on the nest with the male close at hand as around them Shelducks and Oystercatchers played out their spring displays. Still 4 Tufted Ducks sailing around the pool, and once again a Kingfisher put in an all too brief appearance. 

A circuit of Jeremy Lane/Moss Lane/Slack Lane found me stopping at several points to look for Sedge Warblers or Whitethroats after I’d heard their respective chattering songs. In fact I reckoned I saw and heard 12+ Sedge Warbler, 10 Whitethroat, 8 Skylark, 4 Willow Warbler, 4 Reed Bunting and a single Whinchat, the latter a fine looking male posing briefly alongside the road. 

Whinchat - Photo credit: Radovan Václav via Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Skylark

Sedge Warbler
 
The local hares are getting more active although they are not always easy to see in some of the grassy silage fields that are almost ready for a first cut after the wet and mild winter. The European or Brown Hare Lepus eurpeaus is a sturdy and handsome beast,  nothing like the cuddly “bunny” of pet shops and children’s tales that people mistake them for.

Brown Hare

Stay tuned for more news and photos soon from Another Bird Blog.

Linking today to Anni's Birding.

And, dear reader, when you have a minute to spare. For once, here’s a worthwhile petition to sign.

"Re-engagement with Britain's natural history has never been more urgent. Young people need the skills to name, observe, monitor and record wildlife. It is vital to understand the contribution nature makes to our lives physically, culturally, emotionally and scientifically both in the past and today".

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/176749



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Willows In The Wind

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Finally. After a week or and more of strong and cold northerlies the wind dropped enough for a ringing session up at Oakenclough. I met Andy at the almost unearthly hour of 0600. That may not seem early but it did mean a 0500 alarm call followed by a 35 minute road journey in the half-light of morning.  The journey included a Barn Owl hunting the road ahead of my approaching car but the owl had disappeared across the fields by the time I reached the spot. 

The morning began with grey skies and a bitterly cold easterly that improved but slowly to give a little sunshine about 1030. Little wonder then that visible migration was limited to a couple of Swallows and a single Whimbrel. 

A quiet ringing session followed with a large handful of new Willow Warblers and the last of the spring finches. Birds caught: 8 Willow Warbler plus one each of Siskin, Lesser Redpoll, Chiffchaff, Wren and Coal Tit. The Willow Warblers included a “control”, a bird with a ring number not of our own, EDX991, so ringed elsewhere on a previous occasion. We will discover in due course the “who, where and when”. 

Siskin

Lesser Redpoll

Chiffchaff

Willow Warbler
 
Meanwhile, details arrived of a Lesser Redpoll Andy and I caught at Oakenclough on 25th March this year. 

On 27th May 2016 a second year Lesser Redpoll was first captured at Dhoon, Isle of Man and marked with ring number S211085. We recaptured the same bird at Oakenclough on 25th March 2017. Although the elapsed time (302 days) and distances travelled (115km) of this recovery are not of great significance, both of the dates involved are very interesting.

The Lesser Redpoll is a scarce and localised breeding bird (less than 200 pairs) and a summer visitor to the Isle of Man. This recovery indicates that in late May 2016, S211085 was almost certainly breeding near Dhoon. We had thought that many of our springtime Lesser Repolls at Oakenclough were on their way to Scotland. It now seems that a few of them are destined to spend their summer on the Isle of Man. From its geographical location in the middle of the Irish Sea the island is mainly known as a major stop over point for many species of migrating birds in both autumn and spring.

We don’t know for sure where S211085 wintered in 2016/2017, almost certainly south and east in mainland UK or across the English Channel in France/Belgium. In early spring this by now adult male headed back north and west and was intercepted by us on 25th March at Oakenclough.

Dhoon, Isle of Man to Oakenclough

Lesser Redpoll

Don't forget. Stay tuned to Another Bird Blog for the latest news, views and photos.


Source Another Bird Blog

Willows In The Wind

Posted on - In Another Bird Blog
Finally. After a week or and more of strong and cold northerlies the wind dropped enough for a ringing session up at Oakenclough. I met Andy at the almost unearthly hour of 0600. That may not seem early but it did mean a 0500 alarm call followed by a 35 minute road journey in the half-light of morning.  The journey included a Barn Owl hunting the road ahead of my approaching car but the owl had disappeared across the fields by the time I reached the spot. 

The morning began with grey skies and a bitterly cold easterly that improved but slowly to give a little sunshine about 1030. Little wonder then that visible migration was limited to a couple of Swallows and a single Whimbrel. 

A quiet ringing session followed with a large handful of new Willow Warblers and the last of the spring finches. Birds caught: 8 Willow Warbler plus one each of Siskin, Lesser Redpoll, Chiffchaff, Wren and Coal Tit. The Willow Warblers included a “control”, a bird with a ring number not of our own, EDX991, so ringed elsewhere on a previous occasion. We will discover in due course the “who, where and when”. 

Siskin

Lesser Redpoll

Chiffchaff

Willow Warbler
 
Meanwhile, details arrived of a Lesser Redpoll Andy and I caught at Oakenclough on 25th March this year. 

On 27th May 2016 a second year Lesser Redpoll was first captured at Dhoon, Isle of Man and marked with ring number S211085. We recaptured the same bird at Oakenclough on 25th March 2017. Although the elapsed time (302 days) and distances travelled (115km) of this recovery are not of great significance, both of the dates involved are very interesting.

The Lesser Redpoll is a scarce and localised breeding bird (less than 200 pairs) and a summer visitor to the Isle of Man. This recovery indicates that in late May 2016, S211085 was almost certainly breeding near Dhoon. We had thought that many of our springtime Lesser Repolls at Oakenclough were on their way to Scotland. It now seems that a few of them are destined to spend their summer on the Isle of Man. From its geographical location in the middle of the Irish Sea the island is mainly known as a major stop over point for many species of migrating birds in both autumn and spring.

We don’t know for sure where S211085 wintered in 2016/2017, almost certainly south and east in mainland UK or across the English Channel in France/Belgium. In early spring this by now adult male headed back north and west and was intercepted by us on 25th March at Oakenclough.

Dhoon, Isle of Man to Oakenclough

Lesser Redpoll

Don't forget. Stay tuned to Another Bird Blog for the latest news, views and photos.


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Hot-Spot Cold-Spot

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The still northerly breeze meant no ringing but the early morning sun dictated a birding trip to the customary hot-spots, starting at Conder Green. 

On Saturday four Avocets fed together but today it was back to perhaps an earlier pair, probably the two that arrived a couple of weeks ago. Following a good few days of sunnier if not necessarily warm weather the female is now sat on a nest. 

Meanwhile the two second year Avocets that spent a few hours here on Saturday morning seemed to have gone and were merely passing through on their way north and/or east. Avocets don’t normally breed until their third year whereby second year birds make up the numbers in the colonies that Avocets sometimes, but not always choose to breed. Conder Green is large enough for several pairs of Avocets but that is not necessarily a good thing as the species can be very aggressive in seeing off all opposition, large or small. 

There was no such aggression today, mainly because there was little for the Avocets to complain about. The usual water birds comprised 2 Greenshank, 1 Common Sandpiper, 6 Tufted Duck, 8 Teal, 16 Shelduck and 2 Little Egret. A Kingfisher put in another brief appearance by flying through the creek, up and over the road, and then across the pool and out of sight. 

Passerines were hard to come by except for singles of Blackcap, Whitethroat, Willow Warbler, Reed Bunting and Meadow Pipit in the scrubby habitat next to the main road. I’m seeing only male Whitethroats just yet but not in great numbers. The continual north winds, blocking high pressure and below average temperatures must be holding many migrant birds back on the south coast or beyond. 

Whitethroat
 
26th April

Meadow Pipit

As I drove off from Conder Green a Kestrel hovered over the marsh and for a few seconds pulled in a couple of complaining Swallows. I didn’t see too many Swallows during the morning, just one or two House Martins, and I didn’t stop to survey the Sand Martins at Bank Lane. 

The marsh at the end of bank Lane was very quiet, the best I could muster being singles of Whimbrel and Grey Heron, and then 6 Pied Wagtail. 

Whimbrel

I spent quite a while along Jeremy Lane, Moss Lane and up to Cockersands. I had Wheatear, Chiffchaff, Reed Bunting, Linnet, Goldfinch, 3 Sedge Warblers and 3 Whitethroat. Just as feared, a number of fields that held Lapwings and Skylarks have been ploughed just as ground nesting birds have eggs and/or tiny young. I found a pair of Skylark in one regular spot but at another unvarying spot of the last few weeks - nothing. A good few fields had been ploughed right up to the fence line and the 80/100 Lapwings of recent weeks seem well down, replaced today by 8 Stock Doves attracted by the turned soil. 

Skylark

Lapwing

Near Lighthouse Cottage a male Whitethroat was in full song and showy mood for the females yet to arrive. His singing and display circuit proved easy to suss: the overhead wire and then the tallest bushes of the roadside plot, followed by a scurry along the roadside fence where sprigs of bramble provided cover. A singing Sedge Warbler stuck to the vegetation and wasn’t as obliging as the Whitethroat. 

An adult male Whitethroat has a lovely pink wash across the breast upon first arrival in late April but the healthy glow soon vanishes during the rough and tumble of a British summer. 

Whitethroat

Whitethroat

Sedge Warbler

Whitethroat

I may be out on Friday if the weather holds good. Log in then for more news, views and photos. 




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Good Morning

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The morning started in fine style. Not a cloud in the sky and a promise of sun all day. There was no ringing today so I set off birding camera at the ready as mist began to clear from the ditches and dykes. 

Pilling morning, Lancashire

All was quiet at Conder Green save for the usual display flights of the Oystercatchers and the resident Shelducks still sorting out their pairs. I looked across at the far bank hoping to see the elusive Avocets but instead of the expected two I saw four. There seemed little aggression between the four with as they all fed together until at one point two flew across to a closer island. After a few minutes the pair flew back to join the others on the far side of the pool and I turned my attention to what else might be lurking unseen.  It was cold and just 3°C at 0730 and visible migration seemed nil apart from a few Swallows and Sand Martins heading north at a fair rate of knots. 

Shelduck

Avocets

Avocet

I looked around for other birds and on the water found 18 Shelduck, 16 Oystercatcher, 6 Tufted Duck, 1 Great Crested Grebe, 1 Goosander and 2 Teal. A Kingfisher flew by but didn’t stay. Kingfishers breed not far away along the canal or upstream of the River Conder which just here is little more than a trickle of water at the end of its journey from the inland fells. 

In the creeks and on the marsh: 2 Greenshank, 1 Spotted Redshank, 1 Common Sandpiper, 1 Curlew, 4 Little Egret, 1 Grey Heron and 2 Pied Wagtail. 

I drove up to Cockersands where the drake Shoveler still frequents the flash flood that will soon dry up. I’d watched him fly in from close by and where I think his mate is hidden on a nest. The handsome Shoveler is now something of a scarce breeding bird in this part of Lancashire whereby a possible breeding pair is quite noteworthy. 

Shoveler

Near Lighthouse Cottage a female wagtail was busy collecting nest material while the male looked on. That looks to be a rather fine finishing material she’s collecting for the nest lining. 

 Pied Wagtail

 Pied Wagtail

I heard my first Whitethroat of the year. It was jumping around between the hedge and the bramble fence-line, singing for all it was worth after that long journey from Africa. There was a Sedge Warbler along the ditch too but it sang from low down with just a sub-song at that. Maybe it tuned up later after I‘d hi-tailed it to3wards the caravan park. 

Whitethroat

I noted several Linnets about and also six or eight very mobile Twite. The Twite spent a minute or two on the overhead wires before they twittered off into the distance towards the shore. The Twite is very closely related to the Linnet and carries the colloquial name of “mountain linnet” after its habitat preference for the uplands. A male Twite has a very short yellow beak and no pink chest, unlike the Linnet which has a heavier greyish bill and at this time of year a bright red chest. The call of the two species in flight is similar, but to the trained ear noticeably different. 

Twite

Twite

There wasn’t much doing near the caravan park although I did notice much more Brown Hare activity than of late, including a little chasing and sparring. The sunny morning helped me see upwards of 20 hares this morning although not all of them were as obliging as the ones that sit motionless, ears sleeked back and disguised as a clump of earth. Mostly they run from the sound of an approaching vehicle or footsteps. Look closer, it’s a Brown Hare, not a bundle of brown soil. 

 Brown Hare

Brown Hare

Towards the caravan park: 6 singing Skylark, 6 Tree Sparrow, 4 Goldfinch, 1 Grey Heron, 1 Little Egret and 80+ Lapwing. 

Skylark

Fingers crossed for those Lapwings and Skylarks.